Trinkbecher/Canteen Cup

Although each soldier in the German Army was issued with a canteen and drinking cup, the cavalry was the one exception and it wasn’t until September/October 1914 that canteens and drinking cups were issued to the cavalry (why the cavalry was never issued with these items in the first place remains a bit of a mystery and defies common sense). The 1894 pattern Trinkbecher or canteen cup issued in 1914 was initially made of aluminum and it held roughly 1/4 liter of liquid. It’s incredibly small and resembles more of a pharmaceutical cup for measuring medicine. Later, on June 10, 1915, the Prussian War Ministry ordered that the cup be manufactured of sheet steel. The Bavarian War Ministry followed suit on July 1, 1915. This new pattern cup was eventually introduced in March 1916 as initial stocks of the 1894 pattern were used up.

Below are some illustrations of the original cup along with the 1916 pattern. The original cup was quite elaborate with two folding handles while the 1915 pattern has only two parts: the cup itself and a small fixed handle that was welded on. These cups were usually carried either attached to the canteen or breadbag in some way or in the breadbag itself.

The two models of Trinkbechers, 1894 and 1916

The two models of Trinkbechers, 1894 and 1916

The 1894 pattern Trinkbecher, front and back views.

The 1894 pattern Trinkbecher, front and back views.

1916 Trinkbecher, side view

1916 Trinkbecher, side view

1916 Trinkbecher, bottom view

1916 Trinkbecher, bottom view

View of the 1916 pattern Trinkbecher. This one is in very good condition, usually they have a large amount of chipping and rust.

View of the 1916 pattern Trinkbecher. This one is in very good condition, usually they have a large amount of chipping and rust.

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